1
2
Highlight China Common topics China Perspectives Faith & Belief Personages Nations & Customs Arts Daily Life
Phrase & Stories Mandarin Chinese Medicine KungFu Sightseeing Food & Drink Archit & Design Business

Search

Ask
I want to know
something about ...
Answer
I love to answer a
question above...
Share
I like to share an
inspiring article...
Discuss
Show knowledge
share your views
and opinions
Newsletters
Sign up for free,
Get latest information
China Perspectives
Chinese Dragon

Chinese Dragon

Chinese dragons are legendary creatures in Chinese mythology and folklore, with mythic counterparts among Japanese, Korean, Vietnamese and Turkic dragons. In Chinese art, dragons are typically portrayed as long, scaled, serpentine creatures with four legs. In contrast to European dragons that are considered evil, Chinese dragons traditionally symbolize potent and auspicious powers, particularly control over water, rainfall, and floods. In yin and yang terminology, a dragon is yang (male) and complements a yin (female) fenghuang "Chinese phoenix lord of demons".

The dragon is sometimes used in the West as a national emblem of China. However, this usage within both the People"s Republic of China and the Republic of China on Taiwan as the symbol of nation is not common. Instead, it is generally used as the symbol of culture. The dragon is also a symbol of power, strength, and good luck.

Historically, the dragon was the symbol of the Emperor of China. In the Zhou Dynasty, the 5-clawed dragon was assigned to the Son of Heaven, the 4-clawed dragon to the Zhuhou (seigneur), and the 3-clawed dragon to the Daifu. In the Qing Dynasty, the 5-clawed dragon was assigned to represent the Emperor while the 4-clawed and 3-clawed dragons were assigned to the commoners. The dragon in the Qing Dynasty appeared on national flags.

In European-influenced cultures, the dragon has aggressive, warlike connotations and it"s conjectured that the Chinese government wishes to avoid using it as a symbol, but most Chinese disagree with this decision. Westerners only sometimes confuse the disposition of the benevolent Chinese dragon with the aggressive Western dragon. In Hong Kong, the dragon is part of the design of Brand Hong Kong, a symbol used to promote Hong Kong as an international brand name.

Many Chinese people often use the term "Descendants of the Dragon" (simplified Chinese: 茅戮鈩⒚♀€灻ぢ悸犆ぢ郝? pinyin: l脙鲁ng de chu脙隆n r脙漏n) as a sign of ethnic identity, as part of a trend started in the 1970s when different Asian nationalities were looking for animal symbols for representations. The wolf was used among the Mongols, the monkey among Tibetans.

In Chinese culture today, it is mostly used for decorative purposes. It is a taboo to disfigure a depiction of a dragon; for example, an advertisement campaign commissioned by Nike, which featured the American basketball player LeBron James slaying a dragon (as well as beating up an old Kung Fu master), was immediately banned by the Chinese government after public outcry over disrespect.

In Chinese daily language, excellent and outstanding people are compared to the dragon while incapable people with no achievements are compared with other, disesteemed creatures, such as the worm. A number of Chinese proverbs and idioms feature references to the dragon, for example: "Hoping one"s son will become a dragon" (忙艙鈥好ヂ惷λ喡惷┞锯劉, i.e. be as successful and powerful as a dragon).

 
   
About Us    |    Statement    |   Advertising   |   Feedback   |   Contact Us
     website counter 4673 All Rights Reserved Since 2008